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Smart Moves For A Healthier You

Every day you make choices; choices about what to eat, how you move your body and how you manage stress. Smart Moves makes these choices clear and simple. That means taking care of you, body and mind, is just a little bit easier.


Smart Moves allows you to be your best, right now, in this moment. Look for Smart Moves all over campus and make Smart Moves for a healthier you.


The Smart Moves initiative originated with the Well University Partnership, a grassroots effort to promote a culture of health and wellness at the UA.

Smart Food Choices

As a college student, staying in balance is key, especially when it comes to eating. For UA faculty, appointed professionals and staff, finding the time and energy to eat well is a constant challenge. There is no single perfect food, nor is there a single best way to eat. That’s why the UA created Smart Moves Food: to help you be your best with foods that work for you, not against you. A Smart Move is a food that has more strengths than weaknesses, is unprocessed,colorful, delicious, and environmentally sustainable. Make a Smart Move to eat real foods, more plant-based food that is grown in the ground, and less processed, bagged or boxed foods.


Eating smart on the UA campus is now easier than ever with Smart Moves. Campus nutrition experts have combined positive and negative aspects of food to help you make healthy choices when deciding what to eat. Just look for the Smart Move icon on campus restaurants. Want more details? Check out the criteria used to evaluate each menu item at the UA!


On Campus Nutrition

You may be wondering what qualifies a food as a Smart Move at the UA. Foods are first assigned positive and negative points according to criteria developed by campus nutrition experts. Add up the positive and negative points, and foods that have a total of 2 or more points are considered to be Smart Moves. We’ve done the work for you! Your UA nutrition experts worked with the Student Union to identify foods that are, without a doubt, good for you and good for our community. Check out this list of on-campus Smart Moves menu items! Smart Moves Food is also watching out for you! Smart Moves do not contain hydrogenated oil or refined flour, nor are Smart Moves excessively high in saturated fat.


Foods that are completely whole, plant-based foods or unprocessed, lean, clean animal-based foods are automatically considered a Smart Move, such as the colorful fruits and vegetables, black beans, olives, avocado, roast beef, antibiotic free chicken breast, and hardboiled eggs found at On Deck Deli and Core. No point system is needed to know that these foods are good for you! Eat up! You can trust Smart Moves to make your body and the world a healthier place to live.

Resources:

Dining Services Smart Moves Center

Dining Services Healthy Options

Smart Moves Food Criteria

Employee Wellness and Health Promotion Program

Campus Health Services Nutrition Resources (Appointments, practical handouts and info)

Cooking on Campus (Recipes galore and awesome hands-on cooking classes)

What’s happening at the Union?

If these Foods Were Animals, They’d be Bad News Bears

Eat Food. Not Too Much. Mostly Plants.
Smart Moves For A Healthier You

Being physically active is one of the most important steps you can take to improve your health and overall wellness. Action is needed!


Make the Smart Move by investing in you and incorporating physical activity into each day.


Please see the links below on the benefits of moving, guidelines for physical activity, examples of physical activity and resources to get you started.


UA Students
UA Faculty/Staff

For every thought you have, a molecule follows, which means your thoughts have a great impact on how your body functions. Slow down, breathe and be well. Take care of your mind and body with these Smart Moves:


  • Be mindful of your self-talk.
  • Be your best, not obsessed.
  • Stay connected to the world and people around you.
  • Get involved in something you love.
  • Practice healthy stress management.
  • Learn more about sexual health and relationships.
  • Moderate alcohol use.
  • Be kind to yourself.
  • Get the sleep your body needs to perform.
  • Look for the brighter side.
  • Get help when you need it.

Resources:

Employee Wellness and Health Promotion Program

Employee Health Screenings

Campus Recreation Wellness Programs

Wildcat Weight Loss

SexTalk

Free Condom Fridays-Health Promotion and Preventive Services

Campus Health Service (3rd Floor of the Highland Commons Building)

Red Cup Q&A – Separating alcohol fact from fiction

Breathe. Here. Now. Breathing exercise

Free Yourself from Fat Talk

Campus Health Facebook

Student Counseling and Psych Services

Employee Assistance Counseling/Consultation

Campus Rec Mind and Body

ASUA Clubs and Organizations

Sleep tips

CHS Relaxation video “Gaia”

CHS Relaxation video “Wonderland”

New Year’s Resolutions
"Smart Moves For A Healthier You"

The Smart Moves icon was developed to serve as the centerpiece for an initiative to promote health and wellness across the UA community. The vision for this initiative was a result of the combined efforts of the Well U Partnership, and the Committee for Healthy and Sustainable Food Choices.


The Well University Partnership, or “Well-U” as many call it, is made up of a diverse group of people from across the UA community whose mission is to develop and support a culture and environment that fosters healthy lifestyles, attitudes and values at the UA. Representatives on the Well U Leadership team come from Campus Health Services, Campus Recreation, Life and Work Connections, Center for Physical Activity and Nutrition, College of Public Health, Parking and Transportation Services, Student Unions Dining Services, College of Nursing and the Office of Sustainability.



Committee Goals

The Committee for Healthy and Sustainable Food Choices is made up of representatives from Campus Health Services, Life and Work Connections, the Student Unions Dining Services and Student Affairs and Enrollment Management Marketing. The committee’s charge was to:


  • Highlight healthy and sustainable food choices on campus
  • Post calorie content of foods offered at the various UA restaurants online and at the point of purchase
  • Provide information online on food allergens and food intolerances (gluten, eggs, peanut, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, wheat, soy and dairy); and food preferences (Halal, Kosher, vegan, vegetarian)
  • Highlight healthy and sustainable food options and environmentally friendly practices already in existence at the Student Union.

History

In the summer of 2011, the Well U Partnership and the Committee for Healthy and Sustainable Food Choices along with Student Affairs and Enrollment Management marketing initiated a plan to develop a campaign to promote health and wellness across the UA community, particularly in regards to physical activity and nutrition. One of the first steps in the process was to involve students. This was accomplished with the support of students in the School of Fine Arts and in the Eller College. Students in Dr. Jackson Boelt’s senior design course were charged with developing the icon through a project assignment. Rebecca Rand, who graduated in December 2011 with a degree in Visual Communications, developed the Smart Moves icon. Students in Dr. Hope Schau’s Integrated Marketing and Communications, and Management of Marketing Communications courses were tasked with developing a marketing and communications plan for the icon and brand.


The Smart Moves icon and brand was launched in phases beginning in September 2012.


The Smart Moves icon will be seen on menus, websites, apps, stairwells, schedules and fitness studios to identify programs, services and food options on campus that are the better choice for promoting active, healthy lifestyles. At the point of decision… make the Smart Move!


UA Students

Benefits of Smart Moves

We all know that physical activity can improve your fitness levels. It is associated with maintenance of a healthy weight, cardiovascular fitness and overall muscle and bone health. Physical activity will provide you with the following:


  • Weight management
  • Improved cardiovascular system health
  • Increased muscle tone
  • Overall health

But there is more! Regular physical activity can have additional health benefits that impact your everyday quality of life. For example, regular physical activity can lead to the following:


  • Better cognitive function and ability to concentrate
  • Improved sleep
  • Decreased levels of stress
  • Improved mood
  • Improved feeling of wellness

These benefits will help in your academic success. So make the right choice, get moving today!


Guidelines for Smart Moves
Examples of Smart Moves
Campus Resources to Smart Moves for UA Students
UA Faculty / Staff

Benefits of Smart Moves

We all know that physical activity can improve your fitness levels. It is associated with maintenance of a healthy weight, cardiovascular fitness and overall muscle and bone health. Physical activity will provide you with the following:


  • Weight management
  • Improved cardiovascular system health
  • Increased muscle tone
  • Overall health

But there is more! The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services* indicates that there is strong evidence that physical activity is associated with the following:

  • Lower risk of coronary heart disease
  • Lower risk of stroke
  • Lower risk of high blood pressure
  • Lower risk of type 2 diabetes
  • Lower risk of colon cancer
  • Lower risk of breast cancer
  • Reduced symptoms of depression

Regular physical activity can have additional health benefits that impact your everyday quality of life. For example, regular physical activity can lead to the following:


  • Better cognitive functioning and ability to concentrate
  • Improved sleep
  • Decreased levels of stress
  • Improved mood
  • Improved feeling of wellness

Guidelines for Smart Moves
Examples of Smart Moves
Campus Resources to Smart Moves for UA Faculty / Staff
Guidelines for Smart Moves

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans in 2008 where they define how much physical activity is necessary for the average adult. These guidelines indicate that adults receive substantial benefits when they engage in the equivalent of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity each week. You don’t have to “work out” for hours per day. In fact, shorter increments of moderate-intensity activity can provide you with these beneficial effects! The guidelines are as follows.


  • All adults should avoid inactivity. Some physical activity is better than none and adults who participate in any amount of physical activity gain some health benefits.
  • For substantial health benefits, adults should do at least 150 minutes (2 hours and 30 minutes) a week of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes (1 hour and 15 minutes) a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity. Aerobic activity should be performed in episodes of at least 10 minutes, and preferably, it should be spread throughout the week.
  • For additional and more extensive health benefits, adults should increase their aerobic physical activity to 300 minutes (5 hours) a week of moderate-intensity, or 150 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity. Additional health benefits are gained by engaging in physical activity beyond this amount.
  • Adults should also do muscle-strengthening activities that are moderate or high intensity and involve all major muscle groups on 2 or more days a week, as these activities provide additional health benefits.

*U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Physical Activity Guidelines

Please click on this link to directly access physical activity guidelines for Active Adults in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines.


A PDF can also be downloaded here.


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Examples of Smart Moving

The Guidelines for adults focus on two levels of intensity: moderate-intensity activity and vigorous-intensity activity. To meet the Guidelines, adults can do either moderate-intensity or vigorous-intensity aerobic activities, or a combination of both. It takes less time to get the same benefit from vigorous-intensity activities as from moderate-intensity activities. A general rule of thumb is that 2 minutes of moderate-intensity activity counts the same as 1 minute of vigorous-intensity activity. For example, 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity a week is roughly the same as 15 minutes of vigorous-intensity activity.


Perhaps the easiest way to track the intensity of physical activity is through “relative intensity”.


Relative intensity is the level of effort required to do an activity. Less fit people generally require a higher level of effort than fitter people to do the same activity. Relative intensity can be estimated using a scale of 0 to 10, where sitting is 0 and the highest level of effort possible is 10. Moderate-intensity activity is a 5 or 6. Vigorous-intensity activity is a 7 or 8.


When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. As a rule of thumb, a person doing moderate-intensity aerobic activity can talk, but not sing, during the activity. A person doing vigorous-intensity activity cannot say more than a few words without pausing for a breath.


Examples of Moderate Intensity Physical Activity
  • Walking briskly (3 miles per hour or faster, but not race-walking)
  • Water aerobics
  • Bicycling slower than 10 miles per hour
  • Tennis (doubles)
  • Pilates
  • Yoga
  • Hiking
  • Dancing
  • Gardening

Examples of Vigorous Intensity Physical Activity
  • Race-walking, jogging or running)
  • Lap swimming
  • Tennis (singles)
  • Aerobic fitness classes
  • Jumping rope
  • Hiking uphill or with a heavy backpack
  • Bicycling 10 miles per hour or faster
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